Introduce an online voting option for elections

It’s time for politics to fast-forward to the present and have online voting introduced.

In the UK, 38 million people are on Facebook, 15 million are on Twitter, and 4.5 million use online dating sites.

According to the Office for National Statistics, 74% of adults in the UK shop online, 55% read the news online, and 53% are banking online.

Meanwhile, compared with 1945-1997, the voter turnout in this country has dropped by 14.3 percentage points. Turnout amongst 18-24 year olds has been the lowest of all age groups in the last four elections. (2001 – 39%; 2005 – 37%; 2010 – 44%; 2015 – 43%).

It’s time that we had a 21st century voting system fit for the digital age we all live in.

The potential benefits of online voting are many and include:

  • Greater levels of voter participation
  • A method of independently voting for those with vision-impairments
  • An accessible method of voting for those with other disabilities
  • Long-term savings in the cost of elections
  • Accurate vote counts
  • The elimination of accidentally spoilt ballots
  • Greater security of the ballot
  • A method of better informing the electorate about each election
  • A future-proofed method of voting for an increasingly digital age

For more information on online voting and how it can be made secure, check out the WebRoots Democracy reports.


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  • tagged this with neutral 2016-08-04 22:28:30 +0100
  • commented 2016-07-30 20:45:53 +0100
    Turnout has very little to do with the voting method. It is trust in our politicians that has eroded, not the system of voting. Much better to spend time and resources helping people make more informed decisions.
  • tagged this with dislike 2016-07-30 20:45:52 +0100
  • commented 2016-06-02 00:04:06 +0100
    The arguments in favour of this proposal are bogus. More seriously in a 2004 essay, Bruce Schneier states that electronic voting systems need to be accurate, fast, scalable and anonymous. He doubts that such a system can be built and I question if a system that allows secrecy of the ballot and transparency of result will ever be possible. There is no evidence that e-voting increases participation, that it’s cheaper, that it’s more accurate, that it’s easier to use, or that it’s more secure. The evidence on security is the opposite. We still live in a country where 25% of the population don’t have email accounts and therefore cannot assert their online identity or use the internet.
  • tagged this with hate 2016-06-02 00:04:05 +0100
  • tagged this with love 2016-05-03 22:03:59 +0100
  • commented 2016-05-03 19:13:01 +0100
    I do not understand why this is not already a thing. Maybe fear of IT procurement!
  • tagged this with love 2016-05-03 19:13:00 +0100
  • tagged this with love 2016-05-03 17:55:29 +0100
  • tagged this with love 2016-05-03 16:19:08 +0100
  • commented 2016-04-03 15:44:29 +0100
    This has to come eventually. Voting as some sort of running commentary would be tiresome, people should only get one opportunity to vote.
  • tagged this with like 2016-04-03 15:44:29 +0100
  • tagged this with like 2016-04-02 12:48:31 +0100
  • tagged this with like 2016-04-02 11:19:06 +0100
  • tagged this with like 2016-04-02 11:04:17 +0100
  • commented 2016-04-02 00:12:02 +0100
    One point to add. To avoid voting fraud/forced voting you need to make ONLY the last online vote count. For example, everyone will be able to vote as many times between the start and end point in the election period (so they can change their minds as the parties debate) but their final vote before the deadline will be their vote.
  • tagged this with love 2016-04-02 00:12:01 +0100
  • published this page in Join the debate 2016-04-01 16:58:19 +0100